Ten Grammatical Errors We Should All Correct

I tend to notice grammatical mistakes because writing is my full-time job. However, we all have fallen into some bad grammar habits due to conversational structure, truncated words on the internet, and sometimes just not knowing what is correct. For many, many years, we saw “15 Items or Less” at the grocery store. Recently, it has been changed to “15 Items or Fewer,” which is really the correct usage, but we had pretty much accepted “15 Items or Fewer.” Here are 10 grammatical mistakes that we all should correct. And, yes, the reason for using “fewer” instead of “less” is explained. 

  1. Improper placement of “me”

Incorrect:       Me and Bobby are going to the meeting at the Westin.

Correct:          Bobby and I are going to the meeting at the Westin.

Incorrect:       You can always count on me and Cindy to stay on schedule.

Correct:          You can always count on Cindy and me to stay on schedule.

Me is always listed last.

  1. Using “that” instead of “who”

Incorrect:       She is the only girl that I would have considered for the job.

Correct:          She is the only girl who I would have considered for the job.

When talking about a person, who should always be used. When talking about an animal, plant, or inanimate object that should always be used.

  1. The expression “these ones”

Incorrect:       I want you to count these ones for the inventory

Correct:          I want you to count these for the inventory.

  1. Not knowing the correct use “its” and “it’s”

Incorrect:       Its a very informative presentation.

Correct:          It’s a very informative presentation.

“It’s” is the contraction for “it is” or “it has.”

Incorrect:       Google needs to update it’s privacy policy.

Correct:          Google needs to update its privacy policy.  

"Its" describes something that belongs to, or is a part of, an animal, plant, or inanimate object.

  1. Incorrect use of “fewer” and “less.”

Incorrect:       There are far less employees in that division since the merger.

Correct:          There are far fewer employees in that division since the merger.

 "Less” is reserved for hypothetical quantities. “Few” and “fewer” are used for things you can quantify.

  1. Incorrect use of “farther” and “further”

Example:        That office is 12 miles further away than I thought.

Correct:          That office is 12 miles farther away than I thought.

 “Farther” implies a measurable distance. ”Further” should be reserved for abstract distances that you cannot always measure.

  1. Use of “irregardless”

Incorrect:       We are moving into that territory irregardless of the challenges we will be facing.

Correct:          We are moving into that territory regardless of the challenges we will be facing.

 “Irregardless” isn’t a word.

  1. The use of “impactful”

Incorrect:       I found his presentation to be very impactful.

Correct:          I was impacted by his presentation.

“Impactful” is a made up buzzword.

  1. Use of “moot”

Incorrect:       The items he bought for the department were moot.

Correct:          It was a moot point because the decision had not been made.

“Moot” is incorrectly thought of as a synonym for superfluous. It really means a subject is disputable or open for discussion.

  1. Use of “Since” and “Because”

Incorrect:       I am no longer with the team because I left two months ago.

Correct:          I am no longer with the team since I left two months ago.

Incorrect:       I do not have to go to those horrible staff meetings since I am not on the team anymore.

Correct:     I do not have to go to those horrible staff meeting because I am not on the team anymore.

 

Contact Rebecca at the Last Word. I will assure that your printed and digital content makes you sound as smart as you

are.

“Since” refers to time. “Because” refers to causation.